This forum uses cookies
This forum makes use of cookies to store your login information if you are registered, and your last visit if you are not. Cookies are small text documents stored on your computer; the cookies set by this forum can only be used on this website and pose no security risk. Cookies on this forum also track the specific topics you have read and when you last read them. Please confirm whether you accept or reject these cookies being set.

A cookie will be stored in your browser regardless of choice to prevent you being asked this question again. You will be able to change your cookie settings at any time using the link in the footer.

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
USB drive kills wired ethernet - tinker board S
#1
Greetings,

I'm a new TB-S user here running Stretch 2.0.8.  In a server role I have swapped the Tinkerboard S for a Pi3B+.  It uses a large USB drive.  Never had a problem with Raspbian except for throughput.

When plugged into the Tinkerboard S, the USB drive also works just fine.  As soon as it is recognized, however, it kills wired ethernet.  Server settings are erased and there is no network function until I reboot and reconfigure the server settings.  Before spending gobs of time experimenting, have any of you had similar experiences and/or found solutions?  Many thanks in advance.

Frank
Reply
#2
how do you power your board?

https://forum.armbian.com/topic/4767-pow...micro-usb/
Armbian. Lightweight Debian Stretch or Ubuntu Bionic for Tinker Board.
Reply
#3
(Yesterday, 07:18 AM)igorpec Wrote: how do you power your board?

Thank you for the reply.  Board power is via a 2.5 amp switching supply -> microUSB - the same supply that the RPi 3B+ used.  There are no other problems (that I am aware of) with board function or booting.  It's just that eth0 goes away and stays away after plugging-in the USB drive.  I will experiment a bit with disabling the disk manager, since the USB drive is a 3.5" HDD (8TB).  But my patience is not endless for this piece of hardware...

Frank
Reply
#4
(Yesterday, 12:38 PM)francolargo Wrote:
(Yesterday, 07:18 AM)igorpec Wrote: how do you power your board?

Thank you for the reply.  Board power is via a 2.5 amp switching supply -> microUSB - the same supply that the RPi 3B+ used.  There are no other problems (that I am aware of) with board function or booting.  It's just that eth0 goes away and stays away after plugging-in the USB drive.

If you power the board via mUSB and you experience strange troubles, especially when attaching things to the USB, and you have Tinkerboard ... issues are (99.99%) related to insufficient powering/voltage drop. mUSB powering is a failed design. It can't deliver 5V and 2.5A after the connector (read article to understand why). That's enough for RPi3 since its less power hungry and it has under voltage protection (!) built into the firmware. In case voltage drops too much it kills CPU cores ... and saves you some troubles. In some cases.

Quote:But my patience

Measure 5V voltage on the board but IMHO you only need to read what's written on the link and perhaps here https://www.armbian.com/tinkerboard/ and act accordingly - secure and make sure powering is O.K. ... or waste energy with totally irrelevant things.
Armbian. Lightweight Debian Stretch or Ubuntu Bionic for Tinker Board.
Reply
#5
(Yesterday, 02:38 PM)igorpec Wrote: Measure 5V voltage on the board but IMHO you only need to read what's written on the link and perhaps here (snip) and act accordingly - secure and make sure powering is O.K. ... or waste energy with totally irrelevant things.

Again, thanks for the suggestion.  I did two things to help the analysis: 

1) I took the 20181023-tinker-board-linaro-stretch-alip-v2.0.8.img and ran it through the DietPi conversion to "un-bloat" and get detailed control over system configuration.  Seemed to work fine - wired networking was always 'up' no matter what else I changed and the tinker board was always available for ssh.
2) I put an oscilloscope on GPIO pins 4 & 6 to monitor the 5v rail.

Result 1 - plugging in the USB HDD caused a very brief voltage drop of (at most) 100mv.  I saw much longer and larger voltage fluctuations based on CPU use without any problem.

Result 2 - mounting the USB HDD consistently killed wired networking.  AND the only way to restore networking (even with dietpi granular controls) was to re-flash the uSD card.  I tried rebooting, re-entering needed parameters in network settings fields, killing and restarting the network, unmounting the USB drive, etc.etc. all with zero success.  

I'm certainly willing to try any other suggestions, but I'm not going to change the physical USB HDD (Seagate 'Expansion' 8TB, formatted as exFAT).

Any and all suggestions much appreciated...

Frank
Reply
#6
On further reflection - the half-baked ASUS software was not what I signed up for.  The board is going back to Amazon...   Sad
Reply
#7
> ran it through the DietPi conversion to "un-bloat"

Look what this script actually do. "un-bloating" means uninstalling man pages and similar "bloatware". In reality it kills your security, install spyware and add bloatware.

> Any and all suggestions much appreciated...

If its not powering ... you have another option to try. Armbian provides kernel (and u-boot) based on mainline (4.19.y). Try that before returning. If you will still have problems, then it's probably hardware issue since I never experienced such problems ... but I also don't use half-backed stock fw.
Armbian. Lightweight Debian Stretch or Ubuntu Bionic for Tinker Board.
Reply
#8
I have never heard of any like this problem before, even the PC.
Even you also checked, it's not like the power issue...

I only have one suggestion, is connect with other USB drive (flash drive) for test. If Ethernet and USB device both work.
Or try find some USB hub /w power adapter, then connect your USB disk to your board through it. If all work...may some how still the power issue.
(because USB disk, usually took at least 5V 0.5A ~1A or more. it still quite more, 2.5~5w?)

BTW I would agree what @igorpec said, we donot know how DietPi work.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)