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Anyone else disappointed with the Tinkerboard?
#11
> Not exactly - its a known problem with many micro USB Power supplies/chargers/leads,

And what did I said? Ofc other boards with the same fail have troubles as well. But not that big since Tinkerboard is relatively powerful board. Compared to RPi for example.

>Solution is to power via the 5v GPIO pin, and with a better PSU.

First hint since day one:
https://www.armbian.com/tinkerboard/
Armbian. Lightweight Debian Stretch or Ubuntu Bionic for Tinker Board.
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#12
I tried different USB cables and power supply, but results are the same.

Finally, I fixed the self-shutdown problem with an old school method: reinstall. The tinker board works fine so far.

It means the USB cable and power supply has a little to do, if any, with this problem, but mostly the script.

It also mean that an old saying(actually not so old) is forever true: if ain't broke, don't fix it.

I suggest think twice before running any scripts.
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#13
(10-05-2019, 12:58 AM)Nobody Wrote: It means the USB cable and power supply has a little to do, if any, with this problem, but mostly the script.

No.

More CPU calculations/load, the more power is required. PSU and cables are the problem. Improper powering is responsible for random and unexplainable events. Well, you could explain them if you would hooked up some measuring tools
Armbian. Lightweight Debian Stretch or Ubuntu Bionic for Tinker Board.
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#14
(09-19-2019, 05:10 AM)MilkyMooness Wrote: Just too many problems. I could never get HDR or 4k video out of the thing without major issues. The official Android OS and Debian OS are both broken out of the box. The board is underpowered. I spent months trying to use it as a simple media device for playing movies on my fancy pants TV.

Finally I gave up and got an ODROID N2. This thing was working out of the box. Installed CoreELEC, hooked it up to the TV, and haven't had to mess with it again.

I mean, I understand it's a tinkerboard meant for tinkering, but even when I would have it working it was something else broken. No audio, glitchy video, can't resize the desktop stuff after changing resolution.

If you are using the latest version of Android, then yes, I agree with you.  When I downgraded to Marshmallow (I think that's 6.x) the screen problems I had went away.  I can't say for sure that 4K is working since I haven't had a 4K video to really test it out, but using a Marshmallow based, slimmed down Android called Slash TV works very well, comes with the Play Store already installed as well as other common apps for HTPC use.  Now my TB-S is a pleasure to use.  It is a shame that something got broke between Android 6.x and 7.x that the TB can't be set to 4K and I don't believe I was able to get 1080P to work, I think I had to downgrade mine to 720P to work on my TV, when running 7.x, it would be nice if Asus took a more proactive role in developing what could be a great alternative to the Pi.
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