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Setup without Mouse/Keyboard/Screen
#1
Hi,

My Tinkerboard arrived and I'm trying to figure out if I can set it up without using external peripherals.

Opening a WiFi Hotspot on my phone without protection and waiting for the Tinkerboard to connect, so I could SSH into it, did not work.
Would this in any way be possible, e.g. does the device boot up and automatically attempt to connect to Wifi?

Appologgies, I have just seen that there was a very similar question here:
https://tinkerboarding.co.uk/forum/thread-886.html

However, my Board is not automatically connecting to an available open WiFi.
Reply
#2
Hi Woozle341,
I too am trying to connect headlessly.  

I loaded the MicroSD card with TinkerOS Debian v2.0.4 and booted with a 3A power supply, but I am not finding the board trying to connect to my wireless network (no IP address found when I scan the local network).  

With a monitor attached, users are saying you first need to enable wireless networking via the desktop and enter the SSID login credentials.  I had assumed that, like the Pi 3 Raspbian OS (Also Debian-based), there would be a config file in the boot sector of the SD card's OS, that one could both enable wireless connectivity and enter the login credentials.  Does anyone know if this is possible and how it is done?

If not, is there a way to use just the keyboard, with no screen attached, to enter commands after the board is fully booted, so as to enable wireless connectivity?

Many thanks for any hints.
William
Reply
#3
(01-04-2018, 03:38 PM)will2learn Wrote: Hi Woozle341,
I too am trying to connect headlessly.  

I loaded the MicroSD card with TinkerOS Debian v2.0.4 and booted with a 3A power supply, but I am not finding the board trying to connect to my wireless network (no IP address found when I scan the local network).  

With a monitor attached, users are saying you first need to enable wireless networking via the desktop and enter the SSID login credentials.  I had assumed that, like the Pi 3 Raspbian OS (Also Debian-based), there would be a config file in the boot sector of the SD card's OS, that one could both enable wireless connectivity and enter the login credentials.  Does anyone know if this is possible and how it is done?

If not, is there a way to use just the keyboard, with no screen attached, to enter commands after the board is fully booted, so as to enable wireless connectivity?

Many thanks for any hints.
William

No way, If you want to setup first with no screen/keyboard. How can you connect the wireless to your network? No way impossible.
You must have screen/keyboard enter your sid and then you are connected.
Setup your wireless first then remove the monitor and then use your cellphone.
Maybe open your router fully and see if the wireless connects without a sid. I am not sure if it will connect on it's own.
You have to have an input device wired or wireless. You can't do something with nothing.
  
ssh:
SSH setup steps:    use cellphone with SSH to access tinkerOS terminal commands, if USB System is unaccessable.
1. Check the IP address of your tinker board via router admin page. (If you don't know, google it.) 
2. Then use any terminal to ssh thing. Putty on Windows system, built-in terminal on Mac, built-in terminal on Linux. Termius on iPhone or Android phone.
3. Mac for example, SSH to your tinker board by using "ssh linaro@192.168.1.x". Here 192.168.1.x is the IP address of tinker board. Input password when it prompt. 
4. On cellphone install Termius. 
Create a new host. Your device has to be connected to the same network as your tinker board.
Alias: whatevernameyouwant
Hostname: 192.168.1.x (your tinker board IP address here)
Group: leave it blank
Tags: leave it blank
User SSH: toggle on
Port: leave it as 22 if you didn't change it
Username: linaro
Password: your password (default is linaro)
Key: leave it blank
Use Mosh: toggle off
Tap save if all info is right. Then tap the newly created host. It will connect if IP, username, password are right. Don't use something like local terminal, it's a simulated one maybe and without ssh built-in. I'm using iOS version. There's no local terminal.
5. After it logs in, you can do stuff like apt-get update and upgrade etc.
   If usb is disabled, execute this in the cell phone:  sudo apt --fix-broken install
Reply
#4
Thanks Jay Smith.

So I knew about Tethering, I knew about SSH... but I did not know you could SSH into a device which is using tethering.  I got the IP address and was able to SSH into it.  Thanks for that missing link.  So I am able to SSH into the Tinker Box, and I assume I will now be able to configure wireless and enable VNC to access the device from my main PC.

Thanks a lot.  I am looking forward to seeing how this box compares to the Pi 3.
William
Reply
#5
(01-04-2018, 04:37 PM)will2learn Wrote: Thanks Jay Smith.

So I knew about Tethering, I knew about SSH... but I did not know you could SSH into a device which is using tethering.  I got the IP address and was able to SSH into it.  Thanks for that missing link.  So I am able to SSH into the Tinker Box, and I assume I will now be able to configure wireless and enable VNC to access the device from my main PC.

Thanks a lot.  I am looking forward to seeing how this box compares to the Pi 3.
William

Please let us know what you find.
Reply
#6
(01-04-2018, 06:06 PM)Jay Smith Wrote:
(01-04-2018, 04:37 PM)will2learn Wrote: Thanks Jay Smith.

So I knew about Tethering, I knew about SSH... but I did not know you could SSH into a device which is using tethering.  I got the IP address and was able to SSH into it.  Thanks for that missing link.  So I am able to SSH into the Tinker Box, and I assume I will now be able to configure wireless and enable VNC to access the device from my main PC.

Thanks a lot.  I am looking forward to seeing how this box compares to the Pi 3.
William

Please let us know what you find.

I finally managed to get it working.  My system was a bare Tinker Board (TB), no keyboard, no monitor, no mouse.  I had only one network cable.  Using the settings below, I was able to use my PC to VNC into the booted TinkerOS system and browse the web.  For anyone having difficulty and with limited hardware to achieve this, I include my instructions below.

My setup instructions are as follows:
Prerequisites:
a.) make sure wpasupplicant is installed: "apt-get install wpasupplicant" (without quotes)
b.) VNC server is installed and ready (this is fairly lengthy, but can easily be googled using something like "install VNC Debian").  To enable it, type: "vncserver".

1.) I used a mobile phone (a Samsung S7 running Android, with no internet capability) to create a Tethered connection over USB to the TB.  Once there, I used the Android app JuiceSSH to connect to the command line (U: linaro, P: linaro).  It is worth noting here that to run certain commands, root access is needed, which is achieved via typing the following on the command line: "sudo su -".  To find the IP address which the tethered connection assigned to the TB, I ran the Android app "Network Scanner".  I used this IP address in JuiceSSH to connect to the TB over SSH.

2.)  I created a hash string of the wireless network passphrase using the following command (without quotes): "wpa_passphrase MyNetworkName MyNetworkPassphrase".  

The output is as follows:
network={
        ssid="MyNetworkName"
        #psk="MyNetworkPassphrase"
        psk=MyNetworkPassphraseHashString
}

You must copy the value of MyNetworkPassphraseHashString, i.e. everything after "psk=".  It will be used in the next step.

3.)  I modified the following file: /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf to include the following:
update_config=1
country=US
network={
        ssid="MyNetworkName"
        psk=MyNetworkPassphraseHashString
}

Note that MyNetworkPassphraseHashString is not enclosed in quotes, whereas the SSID value is.

4.)  Using the command "ip link show wlan0", I was able to get the following:
4: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP mode DORMANT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether f0:03:8c:63:0c:bd brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

The string "BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP" tells me the network is up.

5.)  The command "sudo ip link set wlan0 up" turns it on if it was not already (if the previous point showed it was DOWN and not UP).  Run the command in point 4 to make sure it is up.

6.)  The following command is optional to see any networks that are available: "sudo /sbin/iw wlan0 scan"

7.)  Run this command to tell wpa_supplicant to read the updated config file: "sudo wpa_supplicant -B -D wext -i wlan0 -c /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf".

8.)  Lastly, to view the connection, try this: "/sbin/iw wlan0 link".

9.)  Make sure VNC is running: "vncserver" - it may ask you to set a password for accessing the device over VNC.


This means that Wifi should now be up and running.  You may need to reboot the TB.  I also disconnected the tethering cable for this stage, but that is not necessary I think.  Using the Android App "Network Scanner" you should be able to see the new IP address of the TB.  Just set up the PC version of VNC, enter that IP address and possibly provide the following suffix: ":5901", e.g. "192.168.137.180:5901".

This setup worked for me.  I mostly edited the files in Nano or Vi.  If Nano, you will first need to install that using "sudo apt-get install nano".

Note: I did play around with editing /etc/network/interfaces, but ultimately found this unnecessary.  Also, another user created a useful utility - I was not able to use this to get the wifi to work, but maybe others can:
$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/mikerr...ker-config
$ sudo sh tinker-config

I hope I did not leave out any steps.  Any questions, then please ask away.
William
Reply
#7
(01-04-2018, 10:45 PM)will2learn Wrote:
(01-04-2018, 06:06 PM)Jay Smith Wrote:
(01-04-2018, 04:37 PM)will2learn Wrote: Thanks Jay Smith.

So I knew about Tethering, I knew about SSH... but I did not know you could SSH into a device which is using tethering.  I got the IP address and was able to SSH into it.  Thanks for that missing link.  So I am able to SSH into the Tinker Box, and I assume I will now be able to configure wireless and enable VNC to access the device from my main PC.

Thanks a lot.  I am looking forward to seeing how this box compares to the Pi 3.
William

Please let us know what you find.

I finally managed to get it working.  My system was a bare Tinker Board (TB), no keyboard, no monitor, no mouse.  I had only one network cable.  Using the settings below, I was able to use my PC to VNC into the booted TinkerOS system and browse the web.  For anyone having difficulty and with limited hardware to achieve this, I include my instructions below.

My setup instructions are as follows:
Prerequisites:
a.) make sure wpasupplicant is installed: "apt-get install wpasupplicant" (without quotes)
b.) VNC server is installed and ready (this is fairly lengthy, but can easily be googled using something like "install VNC Debian").  To enable it, type: "vncserver".

1.) I used a mobile phone (a Samsung S7 running Android, with no internet capability) to create a Tethered connection over USB to the TB.  Once there, I used the Android app JuiceSSH to connect to the command line (U: linaro, P: linaro).  It is worth noting here that to run certain commands, root access is needed, which is achieved via typing the following on the command line: "sudo su -".  To find the IP address which the tethered connection assigned to the TB, I ran the Android app "Network Scanner".  I used this IP address in JuiceSSH to connect to the TB over SSH.

2.)  I created a hash string of the wireless network passphrase using the following command (without quotes): "wpa_passphrase MyNetworkName MyNetworkPassphrase".  

The output is as follows:
network={
        ssid="MyNetworkName"
        #psk="MyNetworkPassphrase"
        psk=MyNetworkPassphraseHashString
}

You must copy the value of MyNetworkPassphraseHashString, i.e. everything after "psk=".  It will be used in the next step.

3.)  I modified the following file: /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf to include the following:
update_config=1
country=US
network={
        ssid="MyNetworkName"
        psk=MyNetworkPassphraseHashString
}

Note that MyNetworkPassphraseHashString is not enclosed in quotes, whereas the SSID value is.

4.)  Using the command "ip link show wlan0", I was able to get the following:
4: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP mode DORMANT group default qlen 1000
    link/ether f0:03:8c:63:0c:bd brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

The string "BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP" tells me the network is up.

5.)  The command "sudo ip link set wlan0 up" turns it on if it was not already (if the previous point showed it was DOWN and not UP).  Run the command in point 4 to make sure it is up.

6.)  The following command is optional to see any networks that are available: "sudo /sbin/iw wlan0 scan"

7.)  Run this command to tell wpa_supplicant to read the updated config file: "sudo wpa_supplicant -B -D wext -i wlan0 -c /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf".

8.)  Lastly, to view the connection, try this: "/sbin/iw wlan0 link".

9.)  Make sure VNC is running: "vncserver" - it may ask you to set a password for accessing the device over VNC.


This means that Wifi should now be up and running.  You may need to reboot the TB.  I also disconnected the tethering cable for this stage, but that is not necessary I think.  Using the Android App "Network Scanner" you should be able to see the new IP address of the TB.  Just set up the PC version of VNC, enter that IP address and possibly provide the following suffix: ":5901", e.g. "192.168.137.180:5901".

This setup worked for me.  I mostly edited the files in Nano or Vi.  If Nano, you will first need to install that using "sudo apt-get install nano".

Note: I did play around with editing /etc/network/interfaces, but ultimately found this unnecessary.  Also, another user created a useful utility - I was not able to use this to get the wifi to work, but maybe others can:
$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/mikerr...ker-config
$ sudo sh tinker-config

I hope I did not leave out any steps.  Any questions, then please ask away.
William

Very interesting headless procedure.
1 You install TOS on a microSD, inserted it in the ATB, booting it up, and without any input/output devices. Well, you still need input/output devices......your cellphone.
2 Using VNC to control it.  With only a power cord. And no wired cable because wireless is working.
3 You could plug in a usb SSD and install samba and have a samba file server for home devices.

I have a question.
Can you run this headless ATB without a fan, just using a heatsink?  You can as long as you don't run video on it, I would think.
Reply
#8
Yes, I am not using a fan - I like the silent operation. The heatsink was relatively hot with just basic usage, but I did not monitor the temp for the core. I will do that today I think. So far, I am surprised at how fast the desktop is running via VNC. The ATB hw/sw is far more responsive than the Pi 3/Raspbian - so far at least.
Reply
#9
(01-05-2018, 03:56 PM)will2learn Wrote: Yes, I am not using a fan - I like the silent operation.  The heatsink was relatively hot with just basic usage, but I did not monitor the temp for the core.  I will do that today I think.  So far, I am surprised at how fast the desktop is running via VNC.  The ATB hw/sw is far more responsive than the Pi 3/Raspbian - so far at least.

Here is the best cooling setup.   Put the heatsink in the clear case.  Everything is opened to the air with a large heatsink and a larger fan 40mmx40mmx10mm.
Plug or unplug the fan as needed. Easy to blow out dust.

Moster Case with huge heatsink
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Raspberry-Pi-B-...Ciid%253A1


Clear Case
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cooling-Fan-for...SwmgJY3b7m
Reply
#10
(01-05-2018, 05:24 PM)Jay Smith Wrote:
(01-05-2018, 03:56 PM)will2learn Wrote: Yes, I am not using a fan - I like the silent operation.  The heatsink was relatively hot with just basic usage, but I did not monitor the temp for the core.  I will do that today I think.  So far, I am surprised at how fast the desktop is running via VNC.  The ATB hw/sw is far more responsive than the Pi 3/Raspbian - so far at least.

Here is the best cooling setup.   Put the heatsink in the clear case.  Everything is opened to the air with a large heatsink and a larger fan 40mmx40mmx10mm.
Plug or unplug the fan as needed.  Easy to blow out dust.

Moster Case with huge heatsink
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Raspberry-Pi-B-...Ciid%253A1


Clear Case
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cooling-Fan-for...SwmgJY3b7m

So far, after a few hours playing around with just VNC connected and web browsing, I am not yet hitting 50 degrees.

Oh great, that clear case looks perfect. Thanks for the link.
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